Frequently Asked Questions

Do you take my insurance?

I am not an in-network provider with any insurance company.  This means I will not bill your insurance directly.  However, you can use your insurance through your "out of network" benefits or you can use your Health Savings Account. You would pay my fee, and then pursue reimbursement from the insurance company or HSA.

What is the cost?

  • $140 for the first assessment appointment of 45 minutes
  • $120 per 'regular' session of 45 minutes 
  • $240 per double session of 90 minutes
    *I recommend that couples schedule a double session for their first appointment, which allows time for the assessment immediately followed by a first session.  This session costs $260 ($140 assessment + $120 session).


I accept cash, check, and credit cards (3.7% processing fee).

What happens in a couples assessment appointment?

The assessment session has four parts.
1) We will review the paperwork that I sent to you via email.  I will answer any questions you have and then I will ask questions about you, your relationship, and your goals for counseling.  
2) I meet with one partner individually for a short period of time. 
3) I meet with the other partner individually for a short period of time.
4) I give you feedback based on the assessment thus far.  We will discuss goals for future appointments.  I will provide you with initial impressions about what is happening in the relationship and we will collaborate on what we will focus on in future sessions.

What model of therapy do you use?

I have been trained in and have provided therapy using all models that are considered 'systems models.'  Of these, my therapeutic approach consists mostly of concepts of Bowen Family Systems Therapy, Emotionally-Focused Therapy, and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.   Since every couple is different, the model of therapy I use depends on several factors that I assess during the initial assessment appointment.  

Will you see us if we aren't married? What about if I want to come individually?

Both are fine!


Yes, even though my licensure has "marriage" in the title, I am a relationship therapist. I help people with any of the important relationships in their lives.


Yes, I do see people individually. 

What is the difference between an LCMFT and other counselors, like LCPCs and LCSW-Cs?

The first fundamental difference is that while other counselors are educated about and treat the psychology and behavior of individuals, an MFT learns about relational dynamics and intervenes at a relational and systemic level.  (Sometimes, well-meaning therapists attempt to do couples therapy, but because they are not well-versed in relational therapeutic models, they wind up alternating between the two partners, providing individual therapy to each instead of providing couples therapy to the couple.) 


Another significant difference is that during my training program, I received both live and video supervision for two years.  This means  that AAMFT Approved Supervisors either watched me work from behind a one-way mirror, or they would review the videotapes of my sessions that I recorded each time I saw an appointment. This ensured that I was becoming competent with basic practices of therapy, and becoming skilled at more complex therapeutic interventions.  This type of supervision was an extremely challenging and humbling experience, but I would not be the therapist I am today without this very beneficial requirement in my training program.